Arthritis Care Exercise Booklet

Considering the significant number of clients I’ve seen with chronic back and neck pain, and the great results they have had from participating in Pilates programs with me, I strongly agree with the results of this recent research article I read in SOAP notes from PT Products.

A recent study, funded by the National Institutes of Health, looked at exercise prescription-who is prescribing it, who is getting it, and what kind of exercise is being prescribed-and concluded that exercise may be underutilized for chronic back and neck pain.

A recent study, funded by the National Institutes of Health, looked at exercise prescription-who is prescribing it, who is getting it, and what kind of exercise is being prescribed-and concluded that exercise may be underutilized for chronic back and neck pain.

It’s cathartic to watch Nico’s choices morph from those made in sorrow to those made in forgiveness. As the adults around her flounder and grieve, Nico metabolizes her sister’s death — re-imagining her sister as a kind of protective presence, wearing Margaret’s clothes, comforting Margaret’s boyfriend. The way Nico internalizes her sister rather than her sorrow, is a reminder that growing up is more powerful than mourning. Ultimately it is Nico’s tweenaged stage — and the inevitable rebirth that is part …


While some physical therapists are in a position to provide supervised care, regrettably, our health-care and insurance system isn’t established for them to provide patients with an indication of care they might require for a full recovery. This is where communicating with a client’s PT can be a great networking opportunity to create a lifetime Pilates wellness program for ongoing post-rehab care.

If a client is now in therapy and has been granted the ok to begin Pilates, it’s important to know what the safe movement guidelines are for them at this stage of their recovery. As they progress, it is only with physician or P.T. Approval that increased resistance, and additional ranges of movement should be included in their program. Always defer to the recommendations of their medical health-care providers.

If a client has been released from therapy, it’s still important to check before beginning a program or adding anything new-until their physician, and physical therapist are confident that they are able to do what they want with no restrictions.

Many people with chronic pain may be managing it with medication. This is an important piece of information, as their medications may mask their ability to evaluate how their body feels before, during, and after exercise. Encourage clients to cooperate closely with their physician to monitor how much medication they may actually need, as this may change as they get stronger and more flexible with their exercise program. And be aware that you might easily push too, far too fast, because with their medication they cannot feel the pain that would usually indicate the necessity to stop or modify an exercise.

The answers to these issues, the information given by their health-care providers, and an initial evaluation of standing and walking posture provides the point of departure for developing a safe and effective Pilates exercise program to assist in the care and management of chronic back and neck pain with the goal of using exercise to improve function, decrease symptoms, and minimize disability for an improved quality of life.