Rheumatic Fever Acute Heart Failure Solutions?

Rheumatic heart disease is inflammation and damage to the heart muscle and heart valves that develops as a consequence of rheumatic fever. Rheumatic heart disease is a condition in which permanent damage to heart valves is caused by rheumatic fever. The heart valve is damaged by a disease process that generally starts with a strep throat caused by bacteria called Streptococcus, and may finally cause rheumatic fever. Rheumatic Fever Rheumatic fever is uncommon in the US, except in children who’ve had strep infections that were untreated or inadequately treated. Children ages 5 to 15, especially if they experience frequent strep throat infections, are most at risk for developing rheumatic fever. The infection often causes heart damage, particularly scarring of the heart valves, forcing the heart to work harder to pump blood. The damage may resolve on its own, or it may be permanent, eventually causing congestive heart failure (a condition under which the heart cannot pump out all of the blood that enters it. This leads to an accumulation of blood in the vessels leading to the core and fluid in the body tissues). Rheumatic Heart Disease Symptoms The symptoms of rheumatic fever usually start about one to five weeks after your child has been infected with Streptococcus bacteria. The following are the most frequent symptoms of rheumatic fever. However, each child may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms may include:-Joint inflammation-including swelling, tenderness, and redness over multiple joints. The joints affected are generally the larger joints in the knees or ankles. The inflammation ‘moves’ from one joint to another over several days. – Small nodules or hard, round bumps under the skin. – A change in your child’s neuromuscular movements (this is generally noted by a change in your child’s handwriting and may also include jerky movements). – Rash (a pink rash with odd edges that is commonly seen on the back of the body or arms and legs). – Fever. – Weight loss. – Fatigue. – Stomach pains. The symptoms of rheumatic fever may resemble other conditions or medical problems. Always consult your child’s physician for a diagnosis. Treatment for rheumatic heart disease: Specific treatment for rheumatic heart disease will be given in your child’s physician based on: Your child’s overall health and medical history. – Extent of the disease. – Your child’s tolerance for specific medications, therapies, or procedures. – Expectations for the space of the disease. – Your opinion or preference. The best treatment for rheumatic heart disease is prevention. Antibiotics can usually treat strep throat (a Streptococcus bacterial infection) and stop acute rheumatic fever from developing. Antibiotic therapy has sharply reduced the incidence and death rate of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease. Children who’ve previously contracted rheumatic fever are often given continuous (daily or monthly) antibiotic treatments to prevent future attacks of rheumatic fever and reduce the risk of heart damage. If inflammation of the heart has developed, children may be put on bed rest. Medications are given to help reduce the inflammation, as well as antibiotics to treat the Streptococcus infection. Other medications may be a need to handle congestive heart failure. If heart valve damage occurs, surgical repair or substitution of the valve may be considered.

Rheumatic heart disease is inflammation and damage to the heart muscle and heart valves that develops as a consequence of rheumatic fever. Rheumatic heart disease is a condition in which permanent damage to heart valves is caused by rheumatic fever. The heart valve is damaged by a disease process that generally starts with a strep throat caused by bacteria called Streptococcus, and may eventually cause rheumatic fever.

Rheumatic fever is uncommon in the US, except in children who’ve had strep infections that were untreated or inadequately treated. Children ages 5 to 15, especially if they experience frequent strep throat infections, are most at risk for developing rheumatic fever. The infection often causes heart damage, particularly scarring of the heart valves, forcing the heart to work harder to pump blood. The damage may resolve on its own, or it may be permanent, eventually causing congestive heart failure (a condition under which the heart cannot pump out all of the blood that enters it. This leads to an accumulation of blood in the vessels leading to the core and fluid in the body tissues).

So, what does that mean?

Failure of the heart is generally associated with high blood pressure, and with extreme narrowing of the valves that carry the blood from the bottom of my heart into the large blood vessel called the aorta into which the heart empties. The heart always makes an attempt to handle its increasing burden. It does this by enlarging the muscle fibers and dilating to increase the scale of its cavities. When the load gets too heavy the rhythm of the heart becomes irregular. There may be pain such as that of angina pectoris. The cough that occurs is a result of the congestion in the lungs. With heart failure digestive symptoms may be prominent, including nausea, loss, and regurgitation of appetite, and sensations of fullness in the mid abdomen. A heart that has been damaged by disease such as rheumatic fever or other infections is most likely to fail than a healthy¬Ěheart, of course.

The doctor’s treatment of a failing heart is meant to take work off the heart, help to dispose of extra fluid, and upgrade the heart’s action. The person with congestive failure of the heart, it’s like a man who is going bankrupt because his income and goods have been sharply reduced. He has to cut down immediately on expenditures, and retain a rigid conservation of what he has. In this condition the patient must rely on the doctor to outline his conduct for him. If the man must earn his living, he must get home after work as soon as practicable and spend every moment he can actually resting; this applies equally to the employment of the week-end. The person with a weak heart must avoid climbing stairs; must never lift heavy objects or carry packages. Every source of tension, including family disagreements and arguments, must be eliminated. Excess of tea, coffee, alcohol, and tobacco is a grave misdemeanor for the patient with congestive heart failure.

Even More Info About Rheumatic Fever Acute Heart Failure

The symptoms of rheumatic fever usually start about one to five weeks after your child has been infected with Streptococcus bacteria. The following are the most frequent symptoms of rheumatic fever. However, each child may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms may include:-Joint inflammation-including swelling, tenderness, and redness over multiple joints. The joints affected are generally the larger joints in the knees or ankles. The inflammation ‘moves’ from one joint to another over several days. – Small nodules or hard, round bumps under the skin. – A change in your child’s neuromuscular movements (this is generally noted by a change in your child’s handwriting and may also include jerky movements). – Rash (a pink rash with odd edges that is normally seen on the back of the body or arms and legs). – Fever. – Weight loss. – Fatigue. – Stomach pains. The symptoms of rheumatic fever may resemble other conditions or medical problems. Always consult your child’s physician for a diagnosis.

Specific treatment for rheumatic heart disease will be given in your child’s physician based on: Your child’s overall health and medical history.

Extent of the disease. – Your child’s tolerance for specific medications, therapies, or procedures. – Expectations for the space of the disease. – Your opinion or preference. The best treatment for rheumatic heart disease is prevention. Antibiotics can usually treat strep throat (a Streptococcus bacterial infection) and stop acute rheumatic fever from developing. Antibiotic therapy has sharply reduced the incidence and death rate of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease.

Children who’ve previously contracted rheumatic fever are often given continuous (daily or monthly) antibiotic treatments to prevent future attacks of rheumatic fever and reduce the risk of heart damage.

If inflammation of the heart has developed, children may be put on bed rest. Medications are given to help reduce the inflammation, as well as antibiotics to treat the Streptococcus infection. Other medications may be a need to handle congestive heart failure. If heart valve damage occurs, surgical repair or substitution of the valve may be considered.

Congestive heart failure or heart failure is among the most common conditions affecting the heart. It is the failure of the heart to respond to the body’s demands of adequate blood circulation. The different types of congestive heart failure are acute or chronic heart failure, high-output or low-output heart failure, and left-sided or right-sided biventricular failure. There can likewise be compensated or decompensated heart failure.

According to Gregg C. Fonarow, M.D, Chairman of American Heart Association,’ Despite the increasing number of people with, the prognosis for patients with heart failure has steadily improved. ‘ This is, owing to the improved methods of treatment available for this condition. Though it is a general and a serious condition, with the advancement in medical science as well as the quality of treatment and care, patients can lead a relatively normal life.

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