Smart Advice About Spinal Joint Arthritis?

We can learn a great deal about this disease just from the name of the disease. Guess what? This joint condition is combined with a skin condition often known as ‘the heartbreak of psoriasis’. I know you have heard of that one! Well, psoriasis is a relatively common skin condition in which the skin of the body reacts and shows up as red, raised patches on the skin, alligator-like scaly skin and simply an over all, generalized inflammation of the skin. Right now, psoriasis is known to affect about 2% of Caucasian Americans. But it’s important to remember that this skin condition can most definitely appear in others besides just the Caucasian population.

Retired teaching assistant Teri Honeyfield, 72, who lives near Weston-super-Mare in Somerset, was virtually housebound until she had a new operation. My general health has always been fine. For 30 years, I kept fit with tap dancing classes, gardening and looking after my two grandchildren. But one morning in March 2008 I woke up unable to move because of a sudden, excruciating pain in the middle of my spine. It was really scary. My husband, Rex, suggested I’d slept awkwardly, but …



Mahmoud Radwan became aware of the risks of tissue transplants several months ago when he was facing knee surgery that would use a tendon transplanted from a cadaver. Radwan had been a world-class athlete. He won championships in a type of Kung Fu that includes elements of boxing and wrestling. These days, Radwan is helping his wife run their kiosk in a New Jersey mall. Radwan says it wasn’t Kung Fu that took out his knee. It was an accident at …



QUESTION: Arthritis of the Spine?
My grandfather who's 73 just got diagnosed with Spinal arthritis, can anyone tell me anything about it?

  • Arthritis is a general term that describes many different diseases causing tenderness, pain, swelling, and stiffness of joints as well as abnormalities of various soft tissues of the body. Arthritis can affect any part of the body, including the spine. There are many forms of arthritis but the most common, the most frequently disabling, and often the most painful is osteoarthritis. Osteo- (meaning bone) arthritis mostly affects the weight bearing joints (hips and knees) plus the hands, feet and spine. Normal joints are hinges at the ends of bones usually covered by cartilage and lubricated inside a closed sack by synovial fluid. Another type of spinal arthritis occurs in the facet joints. The facet joints are the joints that connect two vertebrae together. These joints are located in the posterior aspect of the spine. The facet joints can commonly develop thickening and hardening with age, which can lead to arthritis. Arthritis in the facet joints can cause slight to severe pain, sometimes radiating into the buttocks or upper thighs. Spinal arthritis is certainly one of the common causes of back pain which breaks down the cartilage between the aligning facet joints in the back portion of the spine and quite often leads to pain. The facet joints (also called vertebral joints) become inflamed and progressive joint degeneration creates more frictional pain. Back motion and flexibility decrease in proportion to the progression of back pain induced while standing, sitting and even walking. Over time, bone spurs (small irregular growths on the bone also called osteophytes) typically form on the facet joints and even around the spinal vertebrae. These bone spurs are a response to joint instability and are nature's attempt to help return stability to the joint. The enlargement of the normal bony structure indicates degeneration of the spine. Bone spurs are also seen as a normal part of aging and do not directly cause pain, but may become so large as to cause irritation or entrapment of nerves passing through spinal structures, and may result in diminished room for the nerves to pass developing into a condition known as spinal stenosis Causes of Arthritis of the Spine Arthritis occurs when the cartilage in the joints is worn down as a result of wear and tear, aging, injury or misuse. Osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis, also includes loss of cartilage, overgrowth of bone and the formation of bone spurs. This causes the bones under the cartilage to rub together, causing pain, swelling and loss of motion of the joint. Osteoarthritis can occur in any joint but most often occurs in the hips, knees, hands or the spine. I have no clue what all this means, but this sort of explains it. Hopefully it helps

  • Arthritis of the spine is painful and dehabilitating. The vertebrae are bones that have joints on them which are called facets. The facet joints are in the rear of the vertebrae and act as guides that only allow certain motions to occur. As the disc deteriorates and loses size the vertebrae start to come into greater contact and this causes a wearing away of the cartilege that allows them to glide smoothly. As the conditions continue to develop this erosion gets worse creating degenerative changes in the bones, arthritis. The arthritis causes the joints to become larger and in doing so close down the space where the nerves travel creating pain as there is more and more pressure on the nerves. The nerves react by causing pain and or numbness. There are cases where people loss muscle function due to this problem, stenosis of the lumbar spine. The back becomes just like any other arthritic joint in that it is painful to move and makes normal activities painful and slow. The more that he is able to move around the better for it keeps him from getting stiffer. One of the best therapies available would be aquatics. There are programs at local Y's as well as in physical therapy offices. Physical therapy would be a great help in this case as he could work on mobility and strengthening. Posture is of utmost importance for the more he moves away from the norm the worse the stress is to the spine. Massages are also helpful in reducing the pain from tired and sore muscles. For overall pain control ice on the area for fifteen to twenty minutes is the best. It will decrease pain, swelling, and improve mobility better than heat. Talk to his doctor about a referral to a physical therapist.

  • Arthritis is a general term that describes many different diseases causing tenderness, pain, swelling, and stiffness of joints as well as abnormalities of various soft tissues of the body. Arthritis can affect any part of the body, including the spine. There are many forms of arthritis but the most common, the most frequently disabling, and often the most painful is osteoarthritis. Osteo- (meaning bone) arthritis mostly affects the weight bearing joints (hips and knees) plus the hands, feet and spine. Normal joints are hinges at the ends of bones usually covered by cartilage and lubricated inside a closed sack by synovial fluid. Another type of spinal arthritis occurs in the facet joints. The facet joints are the joints that connect two vertebrae together. These joints are located in the posterior aspect of the spine. The facet joints can commonly develop thickening and hardening with age, which can lead to arthritis. Arthritis in the facet joints can cause slight to severe pain, sometimes radiating into the buttocks or upper thighs. Spinal arthritis is certainly one of the common causes of back pain which breaks down the cartilage between the aligning facet joints in the back portion of the spine and quite often leads to pain. The facet joints (also called vertebral joints) become inflamed and progressive joint degeneration creates more frictional pain. Back motion and flexibility decrease in proportion to the progression of back pain induced while standing, sitting and even walking. Over time, bone spurs (small irregular growths on the bone also called osteophytes) typically form on the facet joints and even around the spinal vertebrae. These bone spurs are a response to joint instability and are nature's attempt to help return stability to the joint. The enlargement of the normal bony structure indicates degeneration of the spine. Bone spurs are also seen as a normal part of aging and do not directly cause pain, but may become so large as to cause irritation or entrapment of nerves passing through spinal structures, and may result in diminished room for the nerves to pass developing into a condition known as spinal stenosis Causes of Arthritis of the Spine Arthritis occurs when the cartilage in the joints is worn down as a result of wear and tear, aging, injury or misuse. Osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis, also includes loss of cartilage, overgrowth of bone and the formation of bone spurs. This causes the bones under the cartilage to rub together, causing pain, swelling and loss of motion of the joint. Osteoarthritis can occur in any joint but most often occurs in the hips, knees, hands or the spine. I have no clue what all this means, but this sort of explains it. Hopefully it helps

  • hi sweetheart,,sorry to hear that,, i have it it for yrs.. but as i get older it hurts bad sometimes, you cant hardly bend, stand, or walk, or anything cause it takes your back to make you move ,, mine is curving and it makes me hurt up to my neck at times,, but i got used to it,,its a part of getting older but it runs i my family so he may have got it from his side too,,its hard for him to walk i bet and lay in the bed ,,oh i no how he feels,,don't know how bad it is right now but he will have some rough times trying to do things,,i hope the meds. they give him will help,,and i hope he doesnt have it real bad,, its hard enough for oled people to move as it is but i guess its all cause of the arthritis,,i wish him the best honey and you take care too,,